Ethanol Fermentation





Ethanol has been used for many things since its initial discover over the centuries. The most famous use of the substances happens to be when it is diluted with water and served as an alcoholic beverage. Many people will recognize the distinctive odor and taste of adult beverages. Ethanol’s use as a substitute for fossil fuels is a far more modern development. Many states require the gasoline sold at the pumps to require a certain percentage of ethanol to help reduce green house gas emissions.

Ethanol can be made easily at home. Devices such as the E-Fueler 100 offer a ready-made device that only requires a water hock up. Weather you are making ethyl alcohol in a home brew or making fuel for a vehicle that can run off of ethanol, the basic process is the same. The amount of stock used to produce ethanol differs for each purpose.

For fuel grade ethanol, you will need the appropriate stock for fermentation and a certain amount of yeast. Non-food grade molasses works best, although sugar cane and sugar beets are usually used to produce ethanol. The fermentation process works best when the grain has a low amount of oxygen present, and some types of bacteria will only undergo fermentation under anaerobic condition. The process can take a few days to a few weeks before you have a working product.

There are alternatives to sugar, sugar beets and molasses. Corn and sorghum are frequently used to produce ethanol in the United States. The countries of France and Europe have started to use wine to produce ethanol. Each country produces more wine than its people can drink. Japan uses a similar strategy as Italy and Japan to produce ethanol, but the land of the rising sun replaces wine with saki.

Most people will not produce ethanol in large enough quantities to mix with their gasoline. Cars designed to run on ethanol have not caught on in the United States. A do-it-yourself enthusiast who wants to find an alternative to using fossil fuels can find a conversion kit that will allow his car to run on both gas and water. Ethanol, does, however, produce carbon dioxide when burn and contributes to the greenhouse effect.Ethanol has been used for many things since its initial discover over the centuries. The most famous use of the substances happens to be when it is diluted with water and served as an alcoholic beverage. Many people will recognize the distinctive odor and taste of adult beverages. Ethanol’s use as a substitute for fossil fuels is a far more modern development. Many states require the gasoline sold at the pumps to require a certain percentage of ethanol to help reduce green house gas emissions.

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Comments

  1. J. P. Gorman says:

    It is my goal to produce ethanol from the fermentation and distillation of mesquite seed pods. I have many questions not the least of which is ‘Is this feasible?” I have many bushels of mesquite seed pods fall from my trees each year and a good fabrication shop to use to build processing equipment. I want to try this but have never done fermentation before of anything. Any suggestions?

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